Mark Twain Was Right: The 2001 Cincinnati Riots

Mark Twain Was Right: The 2001 Cincinnati Riots

by Dan P. Moore

Dan P. Moore's first graphic novel Mark Twain Was Right charts the course of the 2001 Cincinnati Riots, the largest urban unrest (the first in the 21st century) since the 1992 LA Riots. Moore's book is an engaging work of journalism—as-narrative-comic, tracing the riot's genesis from the senseless police killing of a 19-year-old black man to the man's funeral six days later. What results is a tumultuous cocktail of nonviolent civil disobedience, frustration-fueled looting, and further police violence. Interviews with people of varying perspectives—activists, community leaders, a looter, bystanders, etc—weave a tale of inner-city community coming together. Here we witness a city boiling over, and all the political grossness, interpersonal rallying, and rampant destruction that entails. At 96 pages, Mark Twain Was Right is an important chapter of American history, a story often overlooked and generally misreported, a piece of our lineage that must not be forgotten.

 

Comments

Gapers Block 3/5/2013

"Mark Twain Was Right is both intimate and educational,"

-Claire Glass, Gapers Block

The Daily Planet 1/2/2013

"The Cincinnati riots are a major moment in recent American history and the roots and causes of the anger and sadness that took over that city for days deserve your attention as much as anything on a comic store shelf. It’s one of those rare instances where comics aren’t just telling this important story better than other media, comics is the only one telling it. Support a unique voice, support a worthwhile book, and get yourself a great book all at the same time. "

Matthew Rosenberg, The Daily Planet
http://www.fpusadailyplanet.com/2012/12/24/try-something-new-3-in-a-galaxy-far-far-away/

Examiner 12/31/2012

"Moore reports some of the story from his direct observation, and the rest through a series of flashback interviews with others who were directly involved. Moore and the other narrators are unflinchingly honest, revealing their mistakes and regrets along with the passion for justice that motivated their actions."

Steve Palm-Houser, Examiner
http://www.examiner.com/review/graphic-novel-recounts-the-2001-cincinnati-riots-from-multiple-points-of-view

avatar Steve Palm-Houser 12/24/2012

Moore reports some of the story from his direct observation, and the rest through a series of flashback interviews with others who were directly involved. Moore and the other narrators are unflinchingly honest, revealing their mistakes and regrets along with the passion for justice that motivated their actions.

http://www.examiner.com/review/graphic-novel-recounts-the-2001-cincinnati-riots-from-multiple-points-of-view

Cincinnati City Beat 11/19/2012

"Dan P. Moore’s ’zine-like graphic comic book Mark Twain Was Right: The 2001 Cincinnati Riots, a 92-page paean he calls “journalism as narrative” that chronicles, in back-and-forth time travel mixing memoir, first-person narrative and interviews, the week preceding Thomas’ shooting death.

MTWR is as much Moore’s coming-of-age story as it is Cincinnati’s and OTR’s."

-Kathy Y. Wilson, Cincinnati City Beat
http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/article-26575-and_never_the_twain_shall_meet.html

Hanging Like A Hex 10/22/2012

I honestly had no idea that for a week back in 2001 Cincinnati was embroiled in some intense race riots over excessive (and repeated) abuse from the police. I mean, the city was nearly under martial law while thousands protested in the streets, busted into city hall, demanded justice, and basically got all socially aware on the powers that be. This book documents it all in comic book form, and it’s a good read I gotta say. History is always way more fun when it’s in comic book form...The story tends to play out in more of an oral biography, taking the stories and experiences of a wide range of citizens involved in some way or another with what happened.

Chris Auman - Reglar Wiglar 9/26/2012

"his journalistic instincts and story-telling chops make this graphic novel a compelling account of an important event in U.S. race relations. Like Joe Sacco's Footnotes in Gaza, Moore doesn't let us forget the smaller, forgotten battles in the larger struggle."

http://www.reglarwiglar.com/reviews/ComicsReviews.html

Jason Sacks - Comics Bulletin 8/27/2012

"you can feel the almost palpable forward energy of this story on nearly every page. [...] Mark Twain Was Right is a great example of comic as reportage, and comics as a way to convey complex ideas in a way that no other artform can convey them."

http://comicsbulletin.com/reviews/4846/review-mark-twain-was-right/