The Chicago Gangster Theory of Life: Nature's Debt to Society

The Chicago Gangster Theory of Life: Nature's Debt to Society

by Andrew Ross

Less Than Half Price! As more and more people in the business world follow Paul Hawken's lead, the idea of the Earth owing something to business comes further into question. This book dispels the ecology movement's public image as an anti-libertarian politick that always 'says no', and preaches self-limitation rather than promising social fulfillment. Andrew assesses the historical appeal of ecological romanticism, long associated with Polynesian peoples, and central today to a tourist industry that is the new mode of Third World underdevelopment. Turning to America, he analyzes the 1933 bombing of New York's World Trade Center in the ecological context of urban development that has made the city a capital both of global finance and of new immigrant cultures. In a response to the bombing and environmental terrorism of the Gulf War, Ross goes on to explore the 'ecology of images' that characterized the media's role in that war's carnage and in the mounting collateral damage of the New World Order. A fourth chapter discusses the much-hyped men's movement as a response to debates among eco-feminists. The book concludes with a sweeping critiques of the new world view being ushered in by geneticists and the biotechnology industry, a philosophy of biological determinism that Ross describes as 'the Chicago gangster theory of life.' There's an ecological future of public affluence, a world where nature is a participant in our social plans, and not an authority locking us into some incontrovertible fate.