Do Not Pet: How Activists Brought Disability Rights to the U.S.

Do Not Pet: How Activists Brought Disability Rights to the U.S.

by Joe Biel Author and Gerta Oparaku Illustrator

Service dogs, wheelchair-accessible buildings, and protection against being fired due to a disability—these basic rights are all a result of the American Disabilities Act, a U.S. federal law passed in 1990. Even though 1 in 4 people in this country have a disability, it took many years of street-level activism and political advocacy to bring the ADA and its precursors into existence. The second, standalone issue of Do Not Pet is the story of that fight in graphic form, introducing the disability rights movement's boldest leaders of the 70s and 80s, as well as some of the everyday people who joined the cause and benefited from the results. It's the thrilling story of a successful struggle for basic human rights, and a powerful lesson in what we can achieve by working together.

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